Wednesday, 30 December 2015

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Margo Whitney

50 years on Bribie Island - Margo Whitney

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Margo Whitney
Madeline (Margo) Whitney came to Bribie Island from Kingaroy with her family in 1918 at the age of six.  Her father George Smith was involved in road construction works including the road from Bongaree to the ocean at Woorim, using cinders from the steamship Koopa.  Her mother Louisa and the three daughters lived for a while in one of the “Twelve Apostle” huts and Margo was one of the first pupils enrolled at the new Bribie School.  Her daughter, granddaughter and great grandchildren have since attended the same school.
 
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Margo Whitney
Photo: Barry Clark
During the war, Margo remained on the island providing essential services at local stores and the temporary hotel, which was relocated during the war from Woorim to Bongaree.  After the war, she opened her own shop at Mac’s Corner on Third Avenue selling fruit, vegetables, poultry and fabric.  In 1962 she opened the “Pretty Girl” frock salon in Toorbul Street and then in 1970 “Coast Casuals” in the new shopping block on First Avenue.

Margo lived for a time in the one isolated house on the left side of the road to Woorim. She was an active community member and was involved in many fund raising ventures.  Margo was a founding member of the Bongaree Ladies Bowls Club in 1952.  At the age of 92 in 2005, Margo had contributed much to the character and commercial development of Bribie Island over 87 years.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Ivan and Clare Tesch

50 years on Bribie Island - Ivan and Clare Tesch

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Ivan and Clare Tesch
Ivan's parents Ben and Myrtle Tesch had lived in Caloundra and Caboolture in the 1930s where they established the Rex Cinema.  Ivan became the projectionist.  During the war years, it was a round-the-clock operation to meet the needs of the many troops stationed in the area. 

After the war, the family moved to Bribie Island and Ivan married Clare.  In 1950 they built a unique round house at Banya Street and soon began a cinema operation, initially in the Anglican Church Hall.  Local artist Ian Fairweather was a regular visitor to these early film shows. 
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Ivan and Clare Tesch
Photo: Barry Clark

Clare began playing the organ in the Anglican Church in 1950 and was still doing so in 2005.  Ben and Ivan also ran the barge ferry service to the island from Toorbul Point and were involved in many business ventures including building and construction, ice and cold storage and electrical repairs.  The cinema moved to its own premises in Cotterill Avenue, and remained very popular until 1973 when the increasing impact of television forced its closure.  The cinema building was then sold to the Baptist Church. 


In 1967, the University of Queensland established an Ionospheric Research Centre on the island to monitor signals in the upper atmosphere.  Because of his diverse experience, Ivan was offered a job in the electrical workshop as a laboratory manager, a position he occupied for the next 18 years until he retired in 1988.  The entire Tesch family has made a significant contribution to Bribie Island for almost 60 years and continues to do so today.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Stella Ray

50 years on Bribie Island - Stella Ray

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Stella Ray
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Stella Ray
Photo: Barry Clark
Stella Ray (nee Aroney) was born in Brisbane in 1919 and came to Bribie Island when she married her ex-soldier husband Percival after the War in 1946. They brought two small second hand ex-army huts by ship to the Island and erected them on land purchased at Spowers Street for £25.  Stella and Percival were among only a few hundred permanent Island residents at that time and lived in these huts without electricity, water or sewerage for 33 years until they built a modest new home on the same block in 1980. The army huts were only demolished in 2004.


They caught yabbies and ran a boat hire business for the tourists as their daughter Glenda grew up.  Stella worked over the next 40 years in the boarding houses, caf├ęs and take-away shops, which opened for the growing tourist trade.  The Rays never owned a motor car, but Stella was a familiar sight riding her bicycle around the Island for over 30 years before she was badly injured when hit by a car at age 75.  Percival Ray died in 2004.  Stella Ray recovered from her accident and still lives an active life after more than 59 years continuous residence on Bribie Island.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Betty Lougheed

50 years on Bribie Island - Betty Lougheed

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Betty Lougheed
Betty came to Bribie Island at the age of 33 with her husband Horace in 1953 and moved into “Avalon” on Welsby Parade where she has lived ever since.  Although the house today has direct views to Pumicestone Passage, back in those days she could not see the water for the many trees and swamp growth.
 
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Betty Lougheed
Photo: Barry Clark
Betty was born in England in 1920 and served in the Air Force during the War. Her younger sister married an Australian soldier after the War and came to live in Caboolture.  Betty and her mother followed soon after, coming out to Brisbane in 1951.

In 1953 Betty married Horace and he brought his new bride to live on Bribie Island.  Horace was a keen fisherman and was involved in property and building. The only local shop in those days, on the site of the current Cornetts store, was known as the “Duck Inn” as it had a very low entry door below the road level.

Horace died in 1979 but Betty has continued to live her very private life enjoying her garden and the amazing development of Bribie Island.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Frank Lee

50 years on Bribie Island - Frank Lee

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Frank Lee
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Frank Lee
Photo: Barry Clark
Frank came to the Island as a young boy with his family in 1953.  He has had a long association with the commercial fishing industry in the area.  His father was a soft drink manufacturer and was one of only two people known to have been buried on Bribie Island.  His father’s grave was later exhumed and relocated to the mainland.


Frank grew up among the Bribie Island fishing community and became a commercial fisherman.  As a young man, he developed a considerable knowledge and experience of environmental and conservation practices.  He now runs his own training company passing on these skills through industry training courses for sustainable fishing practices and accreditation.  During 50 years of residency, Frank Lee and his family have been actively involved with both the community and fishing industry of Bribie Island.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - The Kling family

50 years on Bribie Island - The Kling family

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

The Kling family
Mavis Ormiston was born on Bribie Island in 1920 and in 1937 married Fred Kling who had come to Bribie to work in a bakery.  In 1931 Tom Read established a bakery on the Island and this business was later taken over by Fred and Mavis Kling when World War II caused all but essential services people to be evacuated from Bribie Island.  The bakery on Banya Street remained open to serve the few remaining residents and the many troops stationed on Bribie and at Toorbul Point.
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - The Kling family
Photo: Barry Clark

After the War Fred was a founding member of the Bongaree Bowls Club in 1949.  The Kling family have continued to make significant contributions to the community over many years.  The bakery operated in Banya Street for over 55 years until it relocated to the new Cornett’s Arcade on Welsby Parade, after son Peter soon over the business.


Two children left the Island in their teens and son Richard went away to become a doctor and has spent many years practicing on the Island.  Peter has remained a Bribie resident for over 60 years and continued to operate the family bakery until he retired in 2001.  In 2005, the combined Kling family record of continuous Bribie residence (Mavis 85 years, Fred 70 years, Peter 60 years) together with over 74 years operation of the family bakery, is an almost unbeatable community contribution.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Ted and Patricia Clayton

50 years on Bribie Island - Ted and Patricia Clayton

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Ted and Patricia Clayton
Ted Clayton’s parents Ernie and Marion met on Bribie Island in the 1920's. They owned rental properties and lived most of their time here until 1984. Ted grew up in Brisbane but spent much of his early childhood on family holidays on Bribie, attending the primary school for periods during the 1940s.
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Ted and Patricia Clayton
Photo: Barry Clark

In 1954, Ted married Patricia and they came to live on Bribie in a house Ted built on South Esplanade. As a carpenter Ted did contract building work and together they ran a bait and tackle store. Their family of three daughters and a son grew up on the island.

During the construction of the Bribie Island Bridge in the early 1960's Ted became General Foreman.  Ted Clayton was also one of the Island’s most renowned fishermen and in 1970 started to write articles about fishing.  He became a regular contributor and field editor for "Fishing World" for over 20 years.  Ted’s articles about fishing around Bribie Island created nation-wide interest.


The Clayton family collected a large number of Aboriginal artefacts over more than 50 years residence on the Island.  These have been gifted to the Queensland Museum.  In 1990 Ted and Pat moved from South Esplanade, Bongaree to live a quieter life at Whitepatch.

50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Sally Brennan

50 years on Bribie Island -Sally Brennan

The Bongaree Heritage Trail signs record those few residents who, in 2005, were still living on Bribie Island after 50 years or more continuous residence. Each, in their own way, has made a lasting contribution to the island's community.  Sally Brennan nee Herbert, Ted and Patricia Clayton, The Kling Family, Frank Lee, Betty Lougheed, Stella Ray, Ivan and Clare Tesch and Margo Whitney.

The following excerpt is from the Program for the Official unveiling "50 years on Bribie" Heritage Trail Sign, Wednesday 7 November 2007, Brennan Park, Bongaree.

Sally Brennan
50 years on Bribie - 2005 - Sally Brennan
Photo: Barry Clark
In 1910, Sally’s father Fred Herbert worked on the oyster cutters, ferrying bags of oysters for Tripcony around Bribie Island.  Sarah (Sally) Herbert was born in a hotel at Sandgate in 1920 where the family were the publicans.  They later moved to other hotels in South East Queensland.  They moved to Bribie in 1932 and then to Mt Mee in 1934.  Sally married Bernie Brennan at Goondiwindi in 1940 and they settled on Bribie in 1941.

After the War in 1945, they opened “Brennan’s Store”, converting a small wooden house they purchased in Toorbul Street.  This general store served the basic needs of the few residents and thousands of tourists and campers who came to the Island by boat at weekends and holidays.  The foreshore at Bongaree was always covered with white canvas tents and the smell of campfires.  The shop sold a wide variety of goods and produce and in 1958 became the Island’s first Golden Casket Lottery agency.  In 1965 Brennan’s Store sold the winning first prize ticket to a local Bribie resident.

The three Brennan sons grew up on the Island but it was Sally and her late husband Bernie, who were involved in running the shop for a total of 33 years until 1978.


When camping was stopped on the foreshore in front of the shop, the beautiful tree lined area was named “Brennan Park” as a tribute to their many years of community service.


Saturday, 5 December 2015

Bribie Island's Most Historic House is 100 years old

BRIBIE ISLAND'S MOST HISTORIC HOUSE 100 YEARS OLD
Barry Clark- Founder Bribie Island Historical Society

Bribie Island Historical Society aims to raise awareness and interest in the rich history of Bribie Island.  Historians recognise that Bribie Island contains more history, written and unwritten, than any other place in Queensland.

Coungeau House 2015
The still grand Coungeau House today, raised up,
enclosed and wheelchair friendly.
Photo: Barry Clark
October 31st marked the Centenary of Bribie most Historic House, one of the first houses built in Bongaree, in Banya Street in 1915.  Although 216 years have passed since Mathew Flinders set the first white foot on Bribie Island, it is little more than 100 years since the Island became a destination for holiday makers and pioneer residents.

Building the Jetty, bringing Steamship excursions and making land available at Bongaree in 1912 was the start of it all.  Norm and Emily Coungeau were among the first to buy and build a house in Banya Street in 1915. They had both led interesting lives and ran a popular "Continental" Cafe in Brisbane for many years, visiting Bribie regularly, prior to moving to their retirement home here in 1919.
Coungeau House c1920-1930
Coungeau House, built 1915, when
Banya Street was just an overgrown sand track.
Photo: E. Gobolos

Their commercial success enabled them to become patrons of the Arts and donors to many charitable causes during their 20 years living in their Bribie Home.  As old age and ill health came upon them by 1936 during the great Depression, they decided to gift their magnificent home to the Church of England, and it was then used it as a retreat for Clergy and families for more than 40 years.

During the War years, when most Bribie residents were evacuated, the house was occupied by the American and later the Australian Commander of the Toorbul Point Military Training Camp,located on the site of the new Sandstone Point Hotel.

In the 1970s the House was sold to the Toc-H organisation who have since then made the house available to people in need and with disabilities to stay, and many local groups to use the hall underneath. Toc-H was itself established 100 years ago in 1915, in the heat of WW1 battles in Belgium, by an Australian Chaplain "Tubby" Clayton.  On the last weekend in October 2015 the Bribie Historical Society hosted a significant event to celebrate and recognise 100 years years of both Coungeau House, and the Toc-H movement.

REFLECTING 100 YEARS ON BRIBIE

Attended by 120 invited guests, including many long term Bribie residents and people with personal connections to Banya Street, plus representatives of many   Community and Service Groups and supporters or users of the Toc-H facilities. Many of the guests dressed in period costume which added greatly to the atmosphere of the event, taking people on a fascinating journey through 100 years of local history.

The commemorative programme for the event had been designed to capture the spirit of this special "home" used by a variety of people over the years.  Barry Clark, founder of the Historical Society, welcome the assembled crowd, many of whom had taken a tour of the old house in their splendid costumes.  During the course of the afternoon he introduced many special guests in the context of their historical connection with the House and the Street.

The original owner Emily Coungeau had been a prolific Poet and Libretist and Jenda Jacobs Voices Choral Group began the entertainment by singing one of Emilys songs titled "Aurelle" to convey the style of her writing. The long term caretaker of the Coungeau House, Jan Cleaver, recited one of Emily's 1919 poems, written in the house, titled "Evening at Bribie Island".
Centenary Celebration Team
Rear L-R: Jenda Jacobs, Ray Geise, Lynne Hooper.
Front: Barry and Faye Clark
Photo: Barry Clark

Recently elected Historical Society President Lynne Hooper gave a comprehensive presentation on the life of the Coungeau's, showing many historic photos and documents that captured the remarkable life of these significant, but little recognised, Bribie Islanders and the community in which they lived..

Barry Clark reflected on the War years on Bribie with stories of its military occupation by both American and Australian officers, when there had been a large Training Camp on the site that is now the new Sandstone Point Hotel.  He then introduced a very special guest, Gretel (nee Gehrmann) Quin, who had been a tiny new born baby living at Coungeau House in 1944 with her mother Gabrielle and father Lt.Col. August (Gus) Gehrmann.

PIONEER BRIBIE FAMILIES REPRESENTED

Another special guest was Mike Harris who had contacted the Historical Society with a wonderful story of his Grandmother, Nan Bowles who had lived at Poverty Point on an Oyster lease with her family as a small girl in the 1890s.  Other long term Bribie families from the 1940s and 1950s included the Kling family who ran the Bakery, Tesch who operated the Cinema, Winston who had the Store and grew Tobacco, Sked who had been Postmaster, Hammond who built an Ice works, and Mullen who was the pharmacist.

A few very special people from the 1920s and 1930s had been invited, but due to ill health were unable to attend. These included Dorothy Shirley, Joyce Voysey, Jaquie Hammond and Jean Britnell, whose mother Bobby Britnell was a founding member of Toc-H on Bribie, and her father was manager of the Bribie Island Bowls Club after the war. Other important residents from the 1960s and 1970s unable to attend were Ted Clayton, and historian author Warwick Outram.

During the course of the afternoon the audience enjoyed a moving experience covering 100 years of island history.  The event concluded with an informative presentation by Ray Geise OAM ,Director of Toc-H Australia, outlining the history the movement from its founding in 1915, and the significance of Coungeau House as the only property owned by Toc-H in Queeensland.

The afternoon ended with everyone singing a unique Coungeau House version of "This Old House" led by the Voices Choral Group.  Food and drink was sponsored by Busy Fingers and MBRC and there was much excited conversation as new and old friends reflected on what they had heard.

Organisers were very pleased with the event, recognising the importance of showcasing local history and paying tribute to some important "characters" who made Bribie what it is today, and whose contribution is often forgotten.  Historical Society founder Barry Clark said "There is clearly a growing interest in Bribie's rich history, and to appreciate the people, places and events that took place here just a generation ago. Only a few of these special people are still with us today, so we must respect their contribution and capture their stories before they are lost forever. The commercial future of Bribie Island may well lie in effectively showcasing this history as one of our main attractions".


Bribie's Coungeau House 100 years old

BRIBIE'S COUNGEAU HOUSE -100 YEARS OLD.
Barry Clark- Founder Bribie Island Historical Society

October 31st marked the Centenary of Bribie Island's most historic building, which once again created an opportunity for the Bribie Island Historical Society to showcase the rich history of the Island.

Coungeau House 2015
Coungeau House today, raised up, enclosed and wheelchair friendly.
Photo: Barry Clark
Coungeau House at No. 36 Banya Street was one of the first houses built in Bongaree in 1915 when the island had just become a destination for holiday makers and pioneer residents.  Building the Jetty, bringing Steamship excursions and making land available at Bongaree in 1912 was the start of it all.
Coungeau House c1920-1930
Coungeau House built in Banya Street in 1915.
Photo: E. Gobolos

Emily and Norm Coungeau had both led interesting lives and ran a popular "Continental" Cafe in Brisbane for many years, visiting Bribie frequently by steamship before to moving to their magnificent retirement home here in 1919.  Business success had enabled them to become patrons of the Arts and donors to many charitable causes. Emily was a prolific writer of poems and songs, many of which were published around the world. Indeed she wrote the words of Australia's first Opera.

UNIQUE LIFESTYLE ON BRIBIE ISLAND

They lived a relaxed social life here for 20 years as participants in many aspects of the small community, when the resident population was only about 50 and the holiday visitors numbered in the thousands.  Holiday makers camped in canvas tents along the foreshore, but several Guest houses started up on the island, especially in Banya Street.  Today it is a divided and tree lined road, but in those early days it was just an overgrown sand track, and a long hard walk carrying a suitcase from the Jetty.  Life on Bribie was very special, far away from city life and creating a unique and close knit community.

As old age and ill health caught up with them by 1936, during the great Depression, they decided to gift their magnificent home to the Church of England, when it became a holiday retreat for Clergy and families for the next 40 years.

During the 1940s War years most Bribie residents were evacuated, and the house was occupied by American and Australian Commanders of the Toorbul Point Military Training Camp, located on the site of the new Sandstone Point Hotel.

In the 1970's the House was sold to the Toc-H movement who make it available for people in need and with disabilities to stay, and many local groups to use the hall underneath.  The Toc-H movement was itself established 100 years ago in 1915, in the heat of WW1 battles in Belgium, by an Australian Chaplain "Tubby" Clayton.

On October 31st 2015, the Bribie Historical Society hosted a significant event to celebrate and recognise 100 years years of both Coungeau House, and the Toc-H movement.


TWO CENTENARY EVENTS CELEBRATED

Centenary Team
Rear L to R: Jenda Jacobs, Ray Geise, Lynne Hooper.
Front: Barry and Faye Clark
Photo: Barry Clark
Many long term Bribie residents, with personal connections to Banya Street, and representatives of local Community and Service Groups were invited to celebrate the Centenary. Over 120 invited guests, many dressed in period costume adding greatly to the atmosphere of the event, were taken on a fascinating journey through 100 years of local history.  The  programme for the event had been designed to capture the spirit of this special "home" used by a variety of people over the years.

Barry Clark, founder of the Historical Society, welcome the assembled crowd, many of whom had taken a tour of the old house in their splendid costumes. Jenda Jacobs and her Voices Choral Group began the afternoon singing one of Emilys songs titled "Aurelle" to convey the style of her writing. The long term caretaker of Coungeau House, Jan Cleaver, recited one of Emily's poems written in the house in 1919, titled "Evening at Bribie Island". Guests were surprised to learn of such rich culture existing on little old Bribie island.

Historical Society President Lynne Hooper gave a very well researched presentation on the life of the Coungeau's, showing historic photos and documents capturing the remarkable life of these important, but little recognised early residents, and the community in which they lived.

Barry Clark reflected on the War years on Bribie with stories of its military occupation by both American and Australian officers and the challenges faced during those dark days of WW2.  He then introduced a very special guest, Gretel (nee Gehrmann) Quin, who had been a tiny new born baby living at Coungeau House in 1944 with her mother Gabrielle and father Lt.Col. August (Gus) Gehrmann who was the Training Camp Commander. She had not been back since those days.

SPECIAL GUESTS INVITED

Another special guest was Mike Harris whose wonderful story about his Grandmother, Nan Bowles, living on Bribie as a small girl in the 1890s was published in last month's Bribie Islander.

Barry, Theresa and Mike Harris
Barry Clark with Theresa and Mike Harris,
whose Grandmother's story was published last month.
Photo: Barry Clark
Other long term Bribie families representing the early days were the Kling's who ran the Bakery, Tesch who operated the Cinema, Winston who had the Store, Sked who had been Postmaster, and Mullen who had the pharmacy.  Apologies had been received from much respected early residents and community leaders including Dorothy Shirley, Joyce Voysey, Jaquie Hammond, Jean Britnell, Ted Clayton, and historian author Warwick Outram.

The event concluded with an informative presentation by Ray Geise OAM, Director of Toc-H Australia, outlining the history the movement from its founding in 1915, and the significance of Coungeau House as the only property owned by Toc-H in Queeensland.

A commemorative bronze plaque was presented by the Bribie Island Rotary Club to record the Centenary, and 110 years of Rotary International. The plaque will be mounted on the outside of the building as a visible reminder of its history.

Rotary Plaque Commemorating 100 years
Rotary President Mary Grant presents plaque
to Toc-H Director Ray Geise
Photo: Barry Clark
The Bribi Island Historical Society presented a framed photo of Coungeau House in the 1920s, to be hung in the house as a reminder to visitors of its historic significance.

The crowd enjoyed fine food and drink afterwards sponsored by Busy Fingers and old and new friends enjoyed lively conversation.  Historical Society founder Barry Clark reflected on the successful event and said "There is clearly a growing interest in Bribie's rich history, and to appreciate the people, places and events that took place here just a generation ago. Only a few of these special people are still with us today, so we must respect their contribution and capture their stories before they are lost forever. The commercial future of Bribie Island may well lie in effectively showcasing this history as one of our main attractions".